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March 25, 2020

Published in International Organization 74:3 (Summer 2020)

A principal theme of international relations scholarship following the Cold War was the apparent erosion of state sovereignty caused by globalization's integrative effects and the proliferation of international institutions and networks. In recent years, however, scholars have noted a reverse trend: the reassertion of traditional, or Westphalian, state sovereignty. By contrast, I highlight another recent trend that has gone largely overlooked: the reaffirmation of older “extralegal” and “organic” versions of sovereignty by three of the world's most powerful states—Russia, China, and the United States. After tracing the genealogy of these older concepts, I consider how and why they have gained prominence in the official discourse of all three countries. I also explore the implications of this shift, which not only illustrates the importance of “norm retrieval” in international affairs, but also raises questions about the founda...

February 4, 2019

Source: https://www.thestar.com/politics/federal/2019/02/02/liberal-government-will-still-seek-deeper-trade-ties-despite-beijing-fury-over-meng-extradition.html

.... For University of Ottawa professor Roland Paris, who had a front-row seat to the early days of Trudeau's engagement with China, a lot has transpired since 2015 when Trudeau met Xi at the G20 in Turkey on his first trip abroad as prime minister.

Paris, Trudeau's former foreign policy adviser, says he now shares the security concerns about Huawei, and sees China behaving "much more aggressively both at home and internationally."

But Paris says it doesn't serve Canada's interests "to adopt a Cold War mentality."

China, then and now, "is unlike any power we've ever seen," said Paris. "The Soviet Union was a full-spectrum enemy during the Cold War. China is not an enemy. It is simultaneously a partner and an adversary."

What that means, he says, "is we have to defend ourselves against China when it acts aggressively but it's...

January 25, 2019

China’s apparent use of Canadian detainees as diplomatic bargaining chips is not just a problem for Canada. It is a challenge to all countries that seek to uphold the rule of law...

Continue reading: https://www.chathamhouse.org/expert/comment/canada-front-lines-challenges-rule-law

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Roland Paris
Graduate School of Public and International Affairs

University of Ottawa

120 University Private, Room 6053

Ottawa, Ontario, K1Y 3M5, Canada

rparis@uottawa.ca

+1 (613) 562-5800 x4047
@rolandparis

© Roland Paris 2020