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January 29, 2016

Panel discussion at the 2016 Ottawa Forum.

June 23, 2014

The Harper government’s neglect of diplomacy has resulted in a largely ineffective foreign policy that has not served Canada’s interests, argues CIPS director Roland Paris in this video clip. His remarks were part of a panel discussion organized by Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute on June 23, 2014.

A full video of the discussion is available on the CPAC website.

June 3, 2014

Globe & Mail
 

As Prime Minister Stephen Harper heads to Europe for the G7 summit and anniversary of D-Day, the gap between Canada’s outspoken rhetoric and its diminishing capabilities in international affairs is clearer than ever.

Much of the trip will focus on Russia’s destabilizing actions in Ukraine. First, Mr. Harper will join other leaders in Warsaw to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the end of communist rule in Poland. He and other NATO leaders will likely use the occasion to reaffirm the alliance’s commitment to Poland’s defence. Then he will travel to Brussels for the meeting of the G7, whose member nations will also undoubtedly reiterate their unified opposition to Russia’s behaviour.

However, the prime minister may choose to convey a slightly different message. His government has repeatedly suggested that Canada is leading the Western response to the Ukraine crisis. In the words of Foreign Minister John Baird: “No other government has stood up more forcefully and aggressi...

June 19, 2013

Ottawa Citizen

The practice of international diplomacy is undergoing a revolution. As activists, private and public organizations, political leaders and populations embrace Twitter, Facebook and other forms of social media, foreign ministries have come under increasing pressure to update their operating methods.

Many countries, including the U.S. and Britain, now expect their diplomats to use social media as a regular part of their job — not simply as a virtual “listening post” to monitor political discussions, nor merely as a megaphone for broadcasting press releases, but as a forum for participating directly in these discussions. The traditional model of public communications — one-way transmission of press releases and “key messages” — tends not to work well on social media. For diplomats to build a following, they need to interact, not broadcast.

Although government-to-government communications will remain the core business of statecraft, foreign ministries that fail to adapt to...

June 19, 2013

Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute, Policy Paper (June 2013)

Executive Summary
 

The practice of international diplomacy is undergoing a revolution. As activists, private and public organizations, political leaders and mass publics embrace Twitter, Facebook and other forms of social media, foreign ministries have come under increasing pressure to update their operating methods. Many countries, including the US and Britain, are now encouraging their diplomats to use social media as a regular part of their job – not simply as a virtual “listening post” to monitor political discussions, nor merely as a megaphone for broadcasting press releases, but as a forum for participating directly in these discussions. Foreign ministries that fail to adapt to the social media revolution will lose influence over time: they will forgo  opportunities to shape public discussions that are increasingly channeled through social media, to correct errors of fact or interpretation in real-time, and...

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Roland Paris
Graduate School of Public and International Affairs

University of Ottawa

120 University Private, Room 6053

Ottawa, Ontario, K1Y 3M5, Canada

rparis@uottawa.ca

+1 (613) 562-5800 x4047
@rolandparis

© Roland Paris 2020